Haitian Women’s Experiences of Recovery from Hurricane Matthew
Abstract:  On 4 October 2016 Haiti was struck by a category five hurricane, the strongest such storm in over 50 years. Hundreds were killed and over 1.4 million made homeless. A household survey of 2,792 households was undertaken between 11-21 October 2016. Repeat surveys were taken with a selection of households in December 2016 and February 2017. The survey demonstrated that Haitians were severely affected by the storm, with more than 67% claiming to be made homeless or forced to temporarily relocate. The survey also underlined the importance of food security, particularly among female respondents. A worrying sign is that more than 50% of the respondents were not aware that the storm was coming and less than 6% evacuated beforehand. This assessment offers critical insight into the dynamics of emergency and the impacts of the aid effort.
Cite: Kolbe, A., Puccio, M., Joseph, S. M., Muggah, R., and A. Joersz. (2017). “Haitian Women’s Experiences of Recovery from Hurricane Matthew.” Strategic Paper 26. Igarapé Institute. June.

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Trust and Hometown Associations in Haitian Post-Earthquake Reconstruction
Abstract:
The 7.0 magnitude earthquake on January 12, 2010, in Haiti reawakened a strong sense of purpose in the diaspora to focus efforts beyond family remittances and towards regional and national development. Yet, Haitian hometown associations (HHTAs) in the US struggled to establish a strong, organizational structure to respond systematically and effectively to the country’s increased post-earthquake needs. Based on historical analysis, participatory observations, interviews, and comparisons with other diaspora groups’ models for homeland development, we explore how trust within transnational Haiti has been impacted in the post-earthquake era. We analyze cultural conditionings of the past that constrain the scalability, durability, and viability of HHTAs’ developmental potential to systematically intervene in a coordinated manner regionally and nationally. We examine the ways in which trust—and resistances to it—operates as a mediating lens remobilized by the earthquake for the interpretation of the Haitian past, present, and future.
Cite:
Joseph, S.M., Irazábal, C., & Désir, A. (2017). “Trust and Hometown Associations in Haitian Post-Earthquake Reconstruction.” International Migration. doi:10.1111/imig.12353.

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CSI Strategic Planning and University Partnership: Brief on Final Findings
Introduction
This report serves as a brief summary of research into the planning institutions and university systems in the South Department of Haiti undertaken by Sophonie Joseph on behalf of the Center for Sustainable Urban Development (CSUD). Overall, this work is motivated by the recognition that one of the key aims of CSI should be to support and build local planning and knowledge producing institutions. It is widely recognized that for any society to become resilient to shocks such as natural disasters and move towards sustainable development, it must have robust planning capacities and institutions and the people and resources to make these institutions work well. One aspect of this is the importance of moving towards a situation where the country produces its own planning professionals in adequate numbers and with locally-relevant skills.
With this in mind, the purpose of this work is threefold: 1) to learn about local economic development and urban and regional planning processes, collect existing plans in the region and get preliminary information on these plans including how they were produced and any implementation issues, 2) learn about the opportunities for CSI to engage and collaborate with institutions of higher education and 3) explore the way institutions of higher learning can be incorporated into planning processes.
Cite: Klopp, J.M., Joseph, S.M., Schumacker-Kocik, J. & Marcello, E. 2011. “CSI Strategic Planning and University Partnership Brief.” Center for Sustainable Urban Development (CSUD). Columbia University.

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